Which is the preferred method for getting in touch with customers? Personally, I do all of my bills, banking, etc online, so I do not get much snail mail - and I ignore pretty much everything that comes in my regular mailbox.

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In my opinion, there is no harm in doing both. If they have an email, send an email. You're not overdoing it anyway. Just don't spam, nobody likes that. I personally check my regular mailbox, not everyone has access to internet and there's still that small percentage who prefer real mails than virtual ones.
Great comment Mary, I agree!

Mary Burton said:
In my opinion, there is no harm in doing both. If they have an email, send an email. You're not overdoing it anyway. Just don't spam, nobody likes that. I personally check my regular mailbox, not everyone has access to internet and there's still that small percentage who prefer real mails than virtual ones.
Thanks Matt, and may I add too that conventional mail can very well appear professional... and that is something that is hard to do with an email, particularly if you don't know html and geeky stuffs like that. I personally would choose a well presented regular mail over a short and often short email. But that's just me ;)

Matt Gerchow said:
Great comment Mary, I agree!

Mary Burton said:
In my opinion, there is no harm in doing both. If they have an email, send an email. You're not overdoing it anyway. Just don't spam, nobody likes that. I personally check my regular mailbox, not everyone has access to internet and there's still that small percentage who prefer real mails than virtual ones.
I also use both and it works wonders! Trust me. I think the same technique can be applied in almost all kinds of marketing.

Mary Burton said:
In my opinion, there is no harm in doing both. If they have an email, send an email. You're not overdoing it anyway. Just don't spam, nobody likes that. I personally check my regular mailbox, not everyone has access to internet and there's still that small percentage who prefer real mails than virtual ones.
Very well said Mary!

Mary Burton said:
In my opinion, there is no harm in doing both. If they have an email, send an email. You're not overdoing it anyway. Just don't spam, nobody likes that. I personally check my regular mailbox, not everyone has access to internet and there's still that small percentage who prefer real mails than virtual ones.
The main lesson is that you should not be confined into a single technique or strategy. Combine and experiment, then rinse and repeat...

Now I'm starting to sound like a guru! >_>
Yes you are Mary. But what you've said is true. Real estate is a continuous learning process. Not because you have nailed a few good deals means you don't need to study anymore.

Mary Burton said:
The main lesson is that you should not be confined into a single technique or strategy. Combine and experiment, then rinse and repeat...

Now I'm starting to sound like a guru! >_>
Yes we all know that learning is a continuous process. Even the Gurus need a refresher course every now and then. They even learn from teaching others. How? They get to test what they really know and maybe try to answer questions they never encountered before.

Now we are starting to be OFF topic, I think this is best discussed in this thread: http://real-estate-investing.com/forum/topic/show?id=2284452:Topic:1399&page=1
Email is easier to ignore because of email spams coming from everywhere. I myself would readily delete emails coming from unknown addresses. With that in mind, I think snail mail works better.
Snail mail is actually better. Just make sure that you have an option for email replies so that really interested clients who prefer online communication can contact you.
Email works better from my experience, people find it easier to reply and give feedback. Sometimes it also ends into Instant Messaging. :)
Snail Mail or Email? It doesn't really matter as long as the letter converts to sales or at least interested buyers then it is a success!

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